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20121201
20121231
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for an hour captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great restaurant? how do you -- >> well, what makes a great restaurant i don't know exactly. a great restaurant i think is where the owner and the chef gives all the love he can. >> rose: when does your day start? >> ooh, sometimes 8:00, sometimes 9:00, sometimes 7:00. >> rose: what's the first thing you do? >> oh, it changes a little bit. i stop at the office for 15 minutes and then i go down and look if everything is holding and look -- >> rose: see i had this impression of all of you at the fish market at 4:00 a.m. everyday saying "these are the finest and the freshest" and you're poring over the fish, picking them up and deciding "only this is good enough for my customers, my clientele." >> oh, of course, we are a very aware and we do buy the best and i think what makes a great rest vaunt the cooking also. of course the service, the ambience, and for that we buy the best, we don't wake up at 4:00 in the morning be
's the mayor of new york city and he's also the co-chair of mayors against illegal guns. he's long been an outspoken advocate of gun control. he is now call on the nation's lawmakers to make reducing gun violence their top priority. here's what he said earlier today at a city hall press conference. >> if the massacre in tucson wasn't enough to make our national leaders act, and if the more recent bloodshed in aurora, colorado, and oak creaks wisconsin, and portland oregon and other cities and towns wasn't enough, perhaps the slaughter of innocence at sandy hook elementary school will at long last be enough. back at thismericans hope table. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: on "meet the press" yesterday, at a press conference today you believe that the time is now, that this is the moment to act, and at the same time you are chastising the president for-- i believe the time was a long time ago, the president gave a speech after the massacre in a-- aurora, colorado, saying we have to do something. here we are two years later, another 21,000 people in america killed with guns. we've don
bloomberg. he's the mayor of new york city and he's also the co-chair of mayors against illegal guns. he's long been an outspoken advocate of gun control. he is now call on the nation's lawmakers to make reducing gun violence their top priority. here's what he said earlier today at a city hall press conference. >> if the massacre in tucson wasn't enough to make our national leaders act, and if the more recent bloodshed in aurora, colorado, and oak creaks wisconsin, and portland oregon and other cities and towns wasn't enough, perhaps the slaughter of innocence at sandy hook elementary school will at long last be enough. millions of americans hope that is true. but it's not enough for us to hope. we have to speak up. we have made our voices heard and hold washington accountable for facing up to the epidemic of gun violence in our country. if this moment passes in to memory without action from washington, it will be a stain upon our nation's commitment to protecting the innocence innocent including our children. >> rose: i'm pleased to have mayor bloomberg back at this table. >> thank you
foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news. >> russia's orphans pay the price for a dispute between russia and americans. the gang rape that sparked outrage in india as the victims conditions deteriorate, the politicians look to restore order and offer support. how just 15 cigarettes in a lifetime can lead to cancer. welcome to "bbc world news." coming up, a little girl abducted by her father and taken to pakistan three years ago is now heading back to britain. also, the era of the third age on the silver screen. >> hello, thanks for being with us. russian president putin has signed a bill which bans americans from adopting russian children. the controversial move is said to be part of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanc
with "new york times" -- ""new york times"" chief correspondent. it seems as though the white house's in boxes overflowing with middle east crises. two weeks ago it was cause of. now you have egypt and syria. where can the administration exert influence? >> in syria there is not a huge amount of influence right now. there is probably a tipping point at this moment and they are doing whatever they can out. you heard hillary clinton talk about that. but they have some concerns not only about whether he leaves but what happens to the country after he leaves. the question least assistant and washington usually, but it is being asked in this case -- and then what? if the chemical stores fell into the wrong hands, you could have a problem that could spread out. at this point the question is does seery app implode or explode? >> the red line on syria's use of chemical weapons seems to be shifting. why? >> in august, president obama said his calculus would change if the chemical weapons were moved or used. this week we have heard many warnings against using them. it appears that some have b
in a fire last month. "the new york times" is reporting that wal-mart played a key role in blocking the improvement of safety features at the bangladeshi factory. one representative helped quash a proposal that would help to improve safety investments, calling them not financially feasible. documents found at the fire scene also show five of the factory's 14 production lines were -- devoted to making wal- mart apparel. meanwhile in the u.s., walmart is drawing criticism for planning to reduce health care to those employees working less than 30 hours a week. an internal company policy shows newly employed part-time workers will no longer receive benefits, while those hired in or after 2011 will also lose out if their hours dip below 30 hours a week. labor experts say walmart is following other large employers in exploiting obamacare by shifting the cost of health care onto taxpayers. walmart refused to comment about how many loses would -- workers would lose coverage but instead decided to no longer answer questions from the huffington post, which they accused of biased coverage. the
by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. junot diaz is known to start conversations some folks would rather not have. here he is at a recent conference in baltimore, urging the audienc
in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >> what the chairmanf the fcc is now talking about is making a bad situation much worse by loosening up the cross-ownwnersp rules, which means now that a media giant, one of the big companies, whether it's murdoch's news corp. or anyone else, will be able to own major television stations, a newspaper, and radio stations within a given community. and that means people are jujus not going to be hearing different points of view. >> i brought with me a story from "the new york times" that drives home the point you're making. it begins with a dateline out of san angelo, texas. "call a reporter at the cbs television station here, and it might be an anchor for the nbc station who calls back. or it might be the news director who runs both stations' news operations. the stations here compete for viewers, but they cooperate in gathering the new
." at a news conference, new york mayor and gun control advocate michael bloomberg urged meaningful action from washington. >> gun violence is a national epidemic a national tragedy that demands more than words. we're the only industrialized country that has this problem. in the whole world, the only one. and that is why we need immediate national action from the president and from congress. it should be at the top of their agenda. because what happened at sandy hook elementary school was, sadly, no aberration. >> we will have more on the newtown massacre and gun control after headlines. the white house has issued a new offer to house republicans of the ongoing talks over avoiding the so-called fiscal cliff. on monday, the obama administration disclosed it had submitted a proposal the house speaker john boehner that would extend the bush era tax cuts for households making under $400,000 rather than the $250,000 limit that president obama has long sought. the offer also floats a lower revenue target of $1.2 trillion, down from $1.6 trillion. while obama has offered to cut some $100 billion from
stories of our times. >> when we think of him walking out of that prison in new york, everyone remembers where they were when it happened. it affected us all, everyone, almost as much as september the 11th. >> in the play we never do find out what happened. it all finishes rather oddly. >> then again, in real life we will never know either. in return for a lot of money, the civil charges against him have been dropped. in real life and the play, the truth remains an enigma. ♪ >> this is "gmt" from "bbc world news." headlines, the south african president has been reelected leader of their national congress, virtually guaranteeing him another five years in power. gunmen shot down five women working on a polio vaccination campaign in pakistan. pakistani leaders have previously said that it was a cover for spies and a ruse to sterilize muslims. let's catch up on business news with iran. -- aaron. do we do when you approach the cliff? >> step back from the cliff, georgie. [laughter] >> right answer. president obama, coming to a compromise? >> there has been a long standing deadlock. we keep
saw the focus and had to keep it. tavis: how did new york harry bosch -- how did harry bosch become your guy? >> i think it is because he has a basic idea about fairness that connects to readers. everybody counts or nobody counts. it sounds pretty simple. it is an idealistic view of the world. it is hard to keep going. his efforts to always follow that code, i think -- he is certainly in daring to me because of that. hopefully, that is what translates to be who readers. -- to the readers. tavis: what is your approach, when you are addressing subject matter where race is at the epicenter, like these riot stucks -- like these riots? >> politics intrudes into investigation. harry is relentless, saying, what does politics have to do with justice? you suddenly have to build a story that touches on these things, but does not make any grand statements. i trust the readers to be smart enough to see what is going on, to have the internal discussions. is this the way we want to go? is is reflective of our society now? tavis: are there harry bosch's out there? is he a has been, or they never w
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: master ricardo muti is here, one of the world's great conductors. he has lead some of the best orchestras including the vienna philharmonic, he is currently music director of the chicago symphony orchestra, critics and audiences alike have been dazzled and charmed by the intensity, the technique, the emotion that he and his musicians bring. here is a look at a performance of verdi's requiem. >> when you look at the journey of your life, from the violin, piano, goesing, conducting, is that the perfect sign of flow for someone who wants to lead a great orchestra? >> first i didn't want to be a musician. so the first quality, i mean the first, if you don't want something and you get it. and but i studied very seriously but fortunately-- . >> rose: what did you want to be, do. >> first my father was a medical doctor. we are five brothers. and he wanted one to be a doctor, one to be an architect, one to-- my profession was opposed to become a lawyer, that would have been a disaster, total
ban on the first day of the new congress, challenging president obama to back the bill. the new york times reports the obama administration abandoned a series of gun control measures one year ago as the 2012 election approached and house republicans pushed a probe of the gun sting "operation fast and furious." drafted after the to your 2011 shooting rampage in tucson, arizona, the justice department recommendations centered on improving and expanding the national background check system to reduce access to weapons for criminals and mentally ill. the list included several proposals obama could have enacted by executive order had he chosen to take action at the time. as the nation mourns the newtown victims, a number of additional threats and shootings have been reported since the massacre. a newtown church was evacuated sunday after police responded to a threat against those inside. in indiana man equipped with a 47-gun arsenal was arrested on sunday after allegedly threatening to kill children at a local elementary school. oklahoma police arrested an 18- -year old high school student
out of congressional hearings on the contraception rule. carol maloney of new york criticized the panel at the hearing, which was exclusively male. >> what i want to know is, where are the women? when i look at this panel, i do not see one single woman representing the tens of millions of women across the country who want and need insurance coverage for basic preventive health care services, including family planning. where are the women? >> we are joined by sandra flu, the female would this not allowed to testify at the all male hearing on capitol hill yesterday. >> i was there to talk about the women whose voices have been affected by this policy, who have been affected financially, emotionally, and medically. what i wanted the members of congress and the public to hear is what a difference this policy could make to their lives. i wanted to talk about how birth control is not [no audio] it is not easy and it is incredibly expensive. >> what does this say about the college co-ed susan fluke, who goes before a congressional committee and says essentially, she must be paid to h
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: maestro gustavo dudamel is here, berlin philharmonic once called him the most astonishingly talented conductor industry ever come across. he is beloved bolivar orchestra in vendz well, ven venezuela anw is with the la philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called dos americas here in new york, and we decide to bring, you know, this amazing music that we have, this very latin, in a ways of irs stick but deep music by es at the vek, villalobos, by ar bon, carlos chavez, so for us it is very important to show the soul of our music also, also to play the strauss ballad,
studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with an assessment of the u.s. and global economy, all eyes remain on efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff deadline on january 1st, when automatic spending cuts and tax increases are set to take hold. there is growing optimism on capitol hill that a deal could come soon, yesterday president obama said he would be willing to lower his revenue goal and tax increases at 400,000 instead of 250,000 per household. >> john boehner said he developed a backup plan to avert year-end tax increases if the negotiations with president obama stalls, this occurs in the backdrop of an economic that is bettering on housing and employment data, the global economy continues fragile with the european debt crisis and china i in in. >> rogoff is a professor of public policy and economics at harvard, he is a coauthor of the best selling book, this time is different, eight centuries of financial folly, many consider it to be the authoritative text on the impact of financial crisis around the world. i am pleased to have ken rogoff back on t
in new york. i read it on the plane and was kind of floored by the quality of the writing, and not just as a movie, but how it understood people. ultimately, the framework and the fabric of the reality of this movie is the financial world and power and money, but you can't really sustain a movie about that. it has to be about people and their relationships and how the choices people make resonate through every aspect of their lives and relationships. so that's what struck me, is the maturity of all the characters in this piece feel rich and textured and real to me in a way that it's rare in the movies today to see. besides the fact that obviously it was talking about something that's meaningful to all of us in the world today. tavis: let's talk more about what the movie is about. we kind of jumped into this, and the audience, i'm sure, is like, okay, give me a little bit more on what the film is about. >> you do that. i hate doing that. tavis: oh, come on. >> you do it. you saw the movie. go ahead. tavis: well, you play a character here who has gotten himself in a situation and has to d
. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." authorities in north korea are pressing ahead with their plans to launch what they call a rocket. south korean government officials say their neighbors are sending up a missile. they say it has a range of more than 10,000 kilometers, capable of reaching the s.
the new york yankees in 2003. fans called him godzilla for his power. the team won the world series in 2009 and he got the mvp for three homers in the series. he batted more than 500 homers in 20 years in japan and in the u.s. >> translator: my seven years with the yankees was the best thing in my life. they were my happiest days. >> sad. >> i'm sad. he was one of my favorite yankees. i've been a yankees fan forever. he was great. he was wonderful. he's one of the best players in the past decade. >> he has a lot to give to baseball fans. he should come back to the yanks. >> hideki matsui says he doesn't want to call it a retirement, says he'll still play as an amateur. >>> it's now official, guinness world records has confirmed that a 115-year-old japanese man is the world's oldest living person. not only that he's also the oldest man in history. he lives in kyoto prefecture, western japan. he reached the age of 115 years and 253 days on friday. he was born in april 1897. he worked at a post office for his whole career. after he retired he took up farming. he has 14 grandchildren, 2
over the asyriai greek king. we speak with suzanne bronstein, curator of the jewish museum in new york about the collection of hanukkah lamps, the largest in the world. >> the rabbis associated a miracle with the holiday. that when the ancient soldiers came to rededicate the temple in jerusalem and they lit the menorah in the temple, they only have one thing of oil to burn for one day, burn it burned for eight. that's why we call it the festival of life and why we light the hanukkah lamps. the rabbi going back to earlier felt that the lights of hanukkah lamp were sacred. the rabbis did specify a list of materials preferable to use for the hanukkah lamps, gold and silver, of course, being the best if that. most people couldn't. if you were poor and you couldn't afford a permanent hanukkah lamp, you could use an eggshell or nut shell or potato carved out. the lamps used at home were actually using oil, and then over time in the 19th century and into the 20th century candles were more popular for home use. it's messy to use oil. we tried it. the rabbis in ancient times didn't say much abo
is the aftermath to the deadly shooting in connecticut. we begin with mayor michael bloomberg of new york. >> shame on me if i am, as an american, with the wherewithal to do something, i have the bully pulpit, i have some money to spend to support candidates, shame on me if i don't go and do something. how can i explain to my kids that i didn't do something when, you know, i had this able to change the world. >> rose: we continue with john miller, dr. jeffrey lieberman
, tracking gains in new york. investors were fueled by expectations that u.s. lawmakers are close to reaching a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. >>> fashion a lotaking a look a going on right now, london's ftse trading higher by 0.25% perform dax is up 0.30% and cac is down 0.6%. >>> tokyo shares continued to benefit from a weak yen but a recent rally in chinese stocks kept investors from snapping up shares further. tok tokyo's nikkei ended up over 0.9% after nearly reaching the key 10,000 yen level. in china shanghai composite ended up 0.1%, while hong kong's hang seng slipped just about 0.1%. in india, the sensex closed up about 0.7%. >>> the dollar is little changed against the yen. traders are awaiting the outcome of the boj's two-day policy meeting start wednesday. dollar/yen changing hands at 83.87. euro/yen 110.50. they say a meeting between ldp and boj governor appears limit. >>> foreign direct investment in china fell in november for the sixth straight month due to global uncertainties. a chinese commerce ministry spokesperson said on tuesday that overseas companies invested $8.3 bill
that i like is out of new york and is the figure skaters in harlem. young children who are taught how to i skate. not just roller skates, i skate. it is nice to give to children. we did not have a lot growing up. those of us to have done so much, we need to bring attention to this kind of things so i am proud. tavis: you do stay busy. >> i stay busy. tavis: anything i have messed up? >> i do not know. i got the gowns. tavis: you got the exhibit in, the solo stuff, the magazine. >> is out there. -- it is all there. tavis: i am honored to have you here. i cannot believe -- >> my new record. been good to me." tavis: the new one is the rock- and-roll project. >> it is the best thing i have done on my own. that is also good but it is not commercial. my jazz is not commercial but it is what i enjoy doing. tavis: life has been good to you. >> i have enjoyed it. tavis: there is no way to calculate all the joy and love that the supremes brought to our lives. >> if i had to come back again i would come back as mary wilson, of the supremes but with a little more money. tavis: if you did i get ba
and we hear the voice of "the new york times," like, ooh. then i have to have an awakening. i will get to the point of pain that i finally stopped hitting the snooze button and i go, we're starting over. that is what my faith gives me. i get to start my new 24 hours. whatever time it is, i don't even know what day it is, but at that time, right now, this minute, we're starting over. there is presence and union. we are looking into something so much bigger than our individual egos or destinies' or careers. it is great that we can disseminate information and truth and carry it to people. that is the kind of water we give thirsty people sometimes with what we have figured out. only god will fill that hole. only love, only spirit. you get tired of being half here. always in the future, what is going to happen? there are lots of tools spiritually that people can use. if i wear a gratitude bracelet, it blesses me. i go, stop the train, take a breath. start over now. you kind of do your laws -- lamaz. breathe. tavis: these things are so very important. that notion i raised a moment ago, it al
go under, so does new york, so does the nile delta. so does every low-lying part and city, like new orleans. we are fighting for all people in the same situation. >> what about hawaii? despite donald trump's contrary views, that is where obama was born. >> exactly. we speak to people in hawaii as islanders. they say, you are a sovereign government. when i look at you, i do not see the u.s., i see an islander like me. >> i want to turn to pa ousman jarju. our producer spoke with him. he is from gambia, the chair of the bloc of nations. >> can you describe why this money is needed in how climate change has impacted africa? >> look at the impact we are facing, the floods and droughts on an annual basis. people are dying over the last two decades. over 900,000 people have died in ldc's. there is no need for us to show it, it is very evident. for the countries to really demonstrate that commitment, they need to do more. they have been spending $4 billion on subsidies, but that is going to appease the oil companies. that money is needed in our country. >> that was pa ousman jarju from gam
@democracynow.org or mail them to democracy now! p.o. box 693 new york, new york 10013. [captioning ma
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> good evening. tonight i can roar to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al-qaeda. and a terrorist who is responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children. for over two decades, bin laden has been al-qaeda's leader and symbol, and continued plot attacks against our countries, friends and allies. the death of bin laden signifies the most significant achievement to date in our effort counterterrorisms professionals to work tire loalsly to achieve this outcome. the american people do not see their work nor know their names but tonight they feel the satisfaction of their work and the result of their pursuit of justice. >> rose: that was president obama in may announcing the killing of america's most wanted terrorist. a new film about to be released by the oscar winning director kathryn bigelow and screen writer mark boal examines the ten-year hunt for bin laden. it is called zero dark thirty,
when we begin. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. begin this evening with politic. less than a month remains for lawmaker to reach a deal before the fiscal cliff deadline. the whitehouse open sists tax rates must rise on higher incomes in order to balance spending cuts but republican leadership remains committed to extending the bush tax cuts for all a tax bracket. brainer offer his response to the president. in an interview with julianna goldman of bloomberg news obama called the boehner plan quote out of balance. >> i think that we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it's going to require what i talked about during the campaign which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure that the country grows. and unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks for example about $800 billion worth of revenues but he says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> ro
of the architects that designed the u.n. headquarters in new york, a project that began in 1947. in 1956, niemeyer created a series of landmark structures for brazil's new capital city of brasilia. these include the national congress, the presidential palace, the cathedral and the neteroy contemporary art museum. the country of brasilia was later designated a unesco world heritage site. niemeyer was noted for inventive curving designs. the architect continued working until his 100th birthday. he succumbed to a lung infection at a hospital in his home of rio de janeiro on wednesday. >>> a large cargo ship has sunk off the netherlands after colliding with a container vessel. four crew members have been confirmed dead and seven others are missing. the accident occurred in the waters off rotterdam on wednesday night. the cargo ship had 24 crew members and was carrying a consignment of cars. dutch coast guard say 13 of the crew have been rescued. they say visibility was low at the time of the accident due to a blizzard in high waves. >>> rescue teams are struggling to reach isolated communities in the
the choir of trinity church wall street, in new york. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. the jane henson foundation and the corporation for public broadcasting.
on a nuclear device and set it off in new york or washington or some other city. (instrumental music) >> the president wants $489 billion in defense cuts over ten years. pentagon officials say the goal is to create a smaller, flexible force that can fight traditional wars and mount special operations. >> now that we know the threats that are out there, where is our money being spent? >> the congressional budget office had an estimate that they put the total u.s. spending for defense at $699 billion. now, that is 20 percent of all federal spending, that is more than half of all discretionary spending. it's a substantial commitment to the united states. >> we spend less and less of our defense dollars on things that actually defend us. fifty percent of our defense budget goes to personnel. much of that personnel is bureaucratic personnel manning various defense department sites. >> currently much of the money is going to conventional needs, personnel, r and d and nuclear weapons. >> the congress debated the issue of replenishment of our stock or at least making certain it was okay and
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)